Good News from the Talking Book & Braille Center

The Talking Book & Braille Center serves patrons who are blind or visually impaired, as well as those who may have a physical, perceptual or reading disability that makes it difficult to read standard print. Until recently, users with reading disabilities were required to have their application for service certified by a medical doctor that could verify that the disability was the result of an organic dysfunction. Recent changes in federal legislation have relaxed these requirements and updated the language surrounding eligibility for the TBBC program. 

The updated eligibility language no longer requires a medical doctor’s signature for persons with reading disabilities. These applications can be signed by any certifying authority, which now includes reading specialists, educators, school psychologists, etc.  Hard signatures from the certifying authority are no longer required if the rest of the certifying information is complete.  More information about eligibility and certification can be found at kdl.org/tbbc/how-to-apply/.

"These legislative changes are vital to opening more doors for people with perceptual and reading disabilities by eliminating a barrier to accessing the Talking Book & Braille Center program," said Shelley Roossien, Accessibility & Inclusion Specialist. "This has been years in the making and it is exciting to be able to offer the service to more patrons than ever before."

Please help us spread the word to any individuals or groups you know who may benefit from this service. For additional information about this program, visit www.loc.gov/thatallmayread or www.kdl.org/tbbc. 

  

 

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